When to Pull the Trigger | CCW & Self Defence

The below video shows a man attempting to rob a convenience store clerk at gunpoint.  As seen, the clerk calmly bends over and retrieves his own firearm which he points directly at the assailant.

The two men are now trapped in a stand-off, with either men willing to pull the trigger.  As I have discussed before, presenting a firearm may add fuel to the fire during a confrontation, and knowing how to properly handle a firearm during an altercation is an essential set of skills.

As you can see, the clerk is being quite casual with how he is wielding his firearm, and on two occasions the assailant attempts to swat the clerk’s pistol away.  In Canada, we do not have any laws that allow us to carry concealed or open, but in my mind, once you draw a firearm and point it at a living being, you better be prepared to pull the trigger.  Luckily in this instance both parties survived, and the clerk was able to go home safely.  It was later determined that the firearm possessed by the robber was in fact a BB Gun, but whether the clerk knew this in the instant is unknown.

The first thing that I pull from the video is the way in which the clerk handles his firearm.  He has the gun far away from his body, with only one hand on his weapon, and he does not seem to be completely in control.  He is utilizing a ridiculous “gangster-style” grip with the gun canted and his elbow high, guaranteeing poor control over the firearm, and almost no ability to aim.  Learning how to use your body language, voice, and firearm techniques in sync is a necessary skill set I believe which will aid in enabling you to survive a violent altercation.

I firmly believe that most CCW holders do not possess a desire to hurt or kill anyone, but if you pull out a firearm in response to being presented with the business end of someone else’s, I think it is time to act, and not negotiate.  I do not condone violence as a first response, but had the robber been properly armed, or more intent with his actions the clerk may not have fared so well.

This also highlights the need for proper unarmed training, or learning how to properly control an aggressor.  To play the ‘armchair operator’ had I been in the same situation, you would see a radically different attitude in my body language, and I would have been demanding compliance.  Had these commands not been followed, I highly doubt I would have stood there arguing and and allowing myself to get into a shoving match.  Since this is completely theoretical, take from it what you will, just know that the violence of action has saved many people from becoming victims.

How would you have handled this situation?  What training do you participate in that would have allowed you to fare better than the clerk?

Train well, train often!

Adam

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