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Funker Tactical is simply an umbrella comprised of passionate individuals who have dedicated their lives to something.

Each member represents their own team. Together, we are redefining concepts on holistic training through intellectual exchanges of ideas and concepts.

DanielShaw1

DANIEL SHAW
DEADLY FORCE ENCOUNTERS
DANIEL SHAW is a retired US Marine infantryman with multiple combat tours and instructor titles. He has developed curriculum and training standards for pre-deployment training and Marine Security Forces such as the Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Teams (FAST) and the Naval Nuclear Security Program. His direct action experience includes Level IV VBSS and In Extremis Hostage Rescue. Daniel has been a DOD/USMC firearms instructor for over 15 years. He holds numerous instructor certifications from the US Marine Corps to include foreign weapons and master instructor of Handgun, rifle/carbine, shotgun, and medium to heavy machine guns. Daniel takes his life of training and combat experience and develops and presents curriculum to help law enforcement professionals and responsible armed citizens survive a deadly force encounter. YouTube | Facebook

RyanHooverRYAN HOOVER
KRAV MAGA & COMBATIVES
RYAN HOOVER is the co-founders of Fit to Fight®, a worldwide training organization, specializing in courses related to self-defense, fighting and fitness. Ryan has certified instructors from eight different countries and has taught defensive tactics to law enforcement and military groups, from Ramstein Air Force Base to Denver Highway Patrol Academy and many points in between. He helped develop and draft much of the defensive tactics curriculum for NCBLET. He has also been a featured trainer for the Carolina Panthers NFL Team and Hendrick Motorsports. Ryan has co-authored three books on Krav Maga and is also the co-founder of programs such as Safer Campus Now, Hard Ready, From The Ground Up, and Sparology.  YouTube | Facebook

MilesMoser1 (1)MILES is a highly decorated Canadian Forces Sniper, with 3 combat tours in Afghanistan as a Sniper and 14 months in IRAQ as a private military contractor. His contractor roles ranging from designated marksman, assistant team lead, mission planning, and risk analysis. Since the CF, Miles has stood up a new venture “C/S 66” (Call-Sign-Six-Six). Conceived to provide both education for long range shooting enthusiast and to facilitate a foundation to give back to the Sniper community. Recent C/S 66 activity includes curriculum development, long range instructional training packages, and ballistic research and development. Facebook

 

 

 

DougMarcaida1

 

DOUG MARCAIDA

EDGE IMPACT & WEAPONS OF OPPORTUNITY
DOUG MARCAIDA is an Edge Impact and Weapons of Opportunity Specialist. He travels the world both as a military contractor and private instructor teaching close quarters combatives to military, police and civilians. He holds design collaborations with Kabar, RMJ Tactical and FOX Knives Italy and is widely regarded as the world’s premiere knife instructor. A veteran of the US AirForce, Doug Marcaida is the proud recipient of a Presidential Commendation for his work in the joint training exercises between United States and Filipino Force Recon Marines. He can be seen in the History Channel’s “Forged in Fire” set to air this fall. YouTube | Facebook

 

InstructorZeroINSTRUCTOR ZERO
UNCONVENTIONAL TRAINING & OPERATIONS
INSTRUCTOR ZERO is one of the most recognizable figures in the tactical community. Born from the Italian Military’s Parachute Brigade, FOLGORE, today he remains an active international operative. He is the Director of Security and Security Project Manager of a Special Industrial Site with High Security Profile operating under the control of the Ministry of Economy, Risk analyst for an international financial group, Chief Instructor and President of the Spartan Shooting Academy and CEO of a Security, Military and Defense Advisor Company. He travels the world training Special Military and Police units and is a clinical professor at an Italian University under the Faculty of Security and Investigative Sciences. YouTube | Facebook

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In this video, Instructor Zero details why simply “checking left and right” in a methodical fashion is only a range drill and not adequate in a reality contest. While some may argue that routinely scanning after each discharge builds muscle memory that breaks tunnel vision, this has not proven to be the case under stress in real life deadly force encounters. In fact, Instructor Zero argues that it is a waste of time to do this each and every time during training as it wastes valuable time and energy in a training regiment where individual skills are trained.

In firearms training, scanning your environment immediately after a shooting has gone the way of the office “how ya doin?” We do it instinctively without giving it much thought and we do it without meaning. While muscle memory has its benefits in certain aspects of training, building incorrect muscle memory can be a disservice to progress.

As an example, when you are at the range working on your extraction, it detracts from the technical learning process. When working on accuracy, it becomes a monotonous futile exercise that serves no real purpose when sh!t hits the fan.

What are your thoughts on this? As with everything Instructor Zero teaches, this is only an option. The validity of which solely rests upon its validation and logical application on the basis of YOUR personal experiences.

 

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And more importantly, how to fix them?

Viking Tactics takes us through the “3 Little Kittens” malfunction drill with live demonstration.   Training to deal with malfunctions is a critical component of any firearms training system.  How do you train malfunction drills?

Does anyone have an actual experience with a malfunction during a training scenario or real life scenario?  If so, please share below.

-Adam
[youtube id=”-TqLnBd1udM”]Story time:  Back in 2009, I was a Team Leader in the 101st ABN Infantry.  I had 3 guys directly under me and our platoon (Mortars) and sister platoon (Scouts) were at the live-fire shoot house on Ft. Campbell.  I, myself, had run sim-round shoot houses, but never an actual live-fire in close quarters.  Now it was not only my first time but that I was  also in charge of controlling myself and 3 others, my adrenaline was through the roof as.   In my mind, I now had to think as 4 people instead of 1.

Before our fireteam ever ran “hot” we use the proven crawl, walk, run methodology.  This translated to running the shoot house scenario with no ammo, just using our voices (“Bang, Bang”), blanks with blank firing adapters on our weapons and finally with live 62 grain M855 5.56 ammunition.  My weapon was an M4 with M203 attached and 4×32 TA01NSN Acog.  Everyone else in my team ran a standard M4 with an M2 Comp Aimpoint.  The scenario consisted of 2 hallways and 3 rooms.  The ground was basically sand and it was difficult to use anything but rudimentary footwork (ie. never crossing your feet).

All in all, we ran the scenario 6 times with half of it in daylight and the other half in pitch black using our tac-lights.  During one of the of the scenarios, I had a malfunction on the second room with my target still standing a few feet from me.  Our targets were “little man in the woods” with a balloon tied to a rope behind them.  As the balloon was shot which was non visible and center mass behind target,  the target could fall to the ground.  This is an excellent, cost effective training measure for reactive targets.

When my gun failed to fire, I immediately yelled “Bulldog,” our battalion SOP for a malf, and went to a knee.  The private in my team behind me, took over my lane of fire and took down the target.  As I cleared the malfunction I saw that it was a double feed.  Back then, it wasn’t as common knowledge, but this is an inherent issue with older aluminum mags.   I knew right away that “SPORTS” (The Army equivalent of Tap, Rack Bang) would not fix the issue, so I immediately stripped the mag and performed “remedial action.”  Gun was back up.

You’ll notice in this training video that stripping a double-fed mag is not the same as removing the mag when the gun is working properly.  The second round is usually jammed up in between the bottom of the bolt and the rear of the round is still usually between the feed lips.  This pressure causes the magazine to be stuck in place.  You have to really get full leverage on the body of the magazine and yank downward while ensuring your finger is kept on the mag release.  Many new shooters index fingers tire easily after depressing the mag release for just a few seconds, so it’s important to treat the gun like a tool and man-handle it when seconds count.

-slack