After the Disarm | To Shoot or Not to Shoot

You have just disarmed your gun-wielding attacker, what do you do next?

Ryan Hoover discusses the reality of relieving an attacker of their firearm during a violent confrontation and turning it back on them. While the idea of eliminating a threat with their own weapon is an appealing notion, the reality of such actions are much more complicated.

We have observed many examples in movies and television where the above idea is played out before our very eyes successfully. According to Hoover though, an attempt to do so may leave you as vulnerable as the initial engagement, may injure other people, and is seldom the appropriate response to such situations.

According to Ryan the question: “Why wouldn’t you step back and shoot the assailant?” assumes too many variables, mainly; you are familiar with the weapon, the firearm is real and functions properly, the firearm is loaded, and the individual in question possesses the ability to put accurate shots on target and not endanger innocent people in the immediate area.

During a high-speed, high-stress,  and dynamic situation like an armed confrontation, the above variables are a great deal to assume. In life-or-death situations, incorrect assumptions may very well lead to your own, or another’s grievous injury.

Ryan Hoover, in his honest and open way, recognizes that certain situations and individuals may possess this exact ability, but he goes on to state that with such a large opportunity for fatal error, he would prefer to utilize his personal, or natural weapons (Punches, Elbows, Kicks, Head-butts, et cetera). Using the firearm as a blunt force weapon, and furthermore, striking with the muzzle is not only an effective technique, it also allows us to control the line of fire. He believes this also provides us increased control, and also allows an individual to rely on a more familiar set of skills thus being able to perform more effectively under duress.

While not the situation most fantasize about, if we are able to critically assess our own strengths and weaknesses, I believe that Ryan is ‘on the money’ with his view. We would all love to believe that we would perform flawlessly in such an extreme situation. Unless you have spent considerable time training in high-stress scenarios with firearms, engaging with your natural weapons may be the safest response for yourself, and those in your immediate environment.

Train well, Train often

Adam

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